Blog

LATEST ARTICLE

The PreTRM Test

The PreTRM Test

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
Approximately 4,000,000 births occur in this country each year. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the preterm birth rate in the U.S. was 9.8% in 2016, or about 1 in 10 pregnancies — one of the highest rates in the developed world — resulting in approximately 400,000 premature births each year.At Sera Prognostics we recognize the continuously rising pre term birth costs and health care cost, not to mention the emotional and financial burden it puts on families, and the immediate and life-long health challenges premature babies face.

Taking The PreTRM Test

Taking The PreTRM Test

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
The PreTRM® test is a simple blood test done during the 19th and 20th weeks of pregnancy that is highly predictive of premature birth. You may be wondering why weeks 19 and 20. Our team of incredibly talented doctors and researchers have discovered that during that precise window, two proteins in your blood are highly predictive of premature birth risk. How the test process worksThe test is as simple as having your doctor order the test by filling out a Test Request Form and going to a lab to have a blood sample taken. Within a couple weeks your doctor receives the results that indicate your individual percentage risk of premature birth. Then together you can decide on a pregnancy plan to manage your risk level that is individually created for you and this pregnancy.

Reading Your PreTRM Test Results

Reading Your PreTRM Test Results

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
While you’re considering the PreTRM® test, we thought you might like to see what the test results will look like. The sample test results below may help you better understand what your own test results will look like. You can ask your doctor for a copy of the results after you’ve reviewed your individual risk score together. Test overviewThere are two proteins in your body, IBP4 and SHBG, that act very differently in women who go on to have term babies versus those who go on to have premature babies. During week 19 and 20 of your pregnancy, there are much higher levels of IBP4 and much lower levels of SHBG in women who have premature babies. We combine those measures in a proprietary, mathematical algorithm or predictor. The results are then compared to the baseline or average risk of most pregnant women expressed in a percentage of preterm risk and a comparative risk against the average population.

Requesting the PreTRM Test

Requesting the PreTRM Test

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
During your pregnancy, you have regularly scheduled prenatal visits, which could start at 8 or 12 weeks, followed by a 16-week appointment, and continued regularly scheduled appointments through your pregnancy.Usually at your 8-week appointment you’re getting tons of information and literature to read about your pregnancy, including prenatal and genetic testing. You may find the PreTRM patient education brochure in a “mommy” packet given to you at this visit or materials given to you directly from your healthcare providers. If not, let us know and we’ll follow-up directly with the practice to ensure they have patient education materials on premature birth and the PreTRM test.

Introducing Us To Your Doctor

Introducing Us To Your Doctor

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
The PreTRM® test is so new that you might not have heard about it before. There’s also a chance that the PreTRM test may be new to your doctor, too.Around your 12-week doctor appointment is a good time for both you and your doctor to learn more about the test and to discuss how it can provide important information about your pregnancy. Bringing up something new that may be unfamiliar to your doctor can sometimes be awkward. They don’t like to be caught off guard!

The Effects of Premature Birth

The Effects of Premature Birth

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
Maybe you’ve heard, “If my baby is premature it will be fine because NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Units) are so amazing.” It’s true: NICUs are amazing. But despite the best care, preterm babies (born before 37 weeks of pregnancy) and their families face extraordinary challenges. The leading cause of deathDespite all the advances in obstetrical diagnostics and therapeutics over the past 10 years, premature birth is the leading cause of infant death and illness, and it is the second-leading cause of death in children before 5 years of age.

Premature Birth Can Happen to Anyone

Premature Birth Can Happen to Anyone

Share on:   
November 2, 2017
A premature birth, also called a preterm birth, occurs when a baby is born too early, before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Most women think having a premature baby will never happen to them and most preterm births are unexpected. But it can happen to anyone — even the healthiest women! It crosses all demographics, ages, incomes, and ethnicity. You can do everything right during pregnancy, and still have preterm labor and premature birth. Up to 50% of premature births happen to women with no known risk factors.

Stephanie’s Story of Prematurity and How the PreTRM Test Helped Her

Stephanie’s Story of Prematurity and How the PreTRM Test Helped Her

Share on:   
November 21, 2016
Long before Stephanie was married, she knew she wanted to be a mom. So it wasn’t long after Stephanie and her high school sweetheart, Brian, got married that they began the exciting process of trying to start a family. A few months after this journey began, the couple was elated to learn that they were pregnant. Sadly, Stephanie suffered a miscarriage before the end of her first trimester.

LeAna’s Story of Premature Birth

LeAna’s Story of Premature Birth

Share on:   
November 3, 2016
Prematurity not only impacts families, but has a tremendous impact on businesses. It is a national health crisis and is a major financial drain in both lost worker productivity and rising health care costs for employers. Our family actively participates with the March of Dimes charity with the aim of one day eliminating prematurity. By sharing our story, we hope to spare families the lifelong struggles that being born too soon causes.

PreTRM Test Featured in The Salt Lake Tribune

PreTRM Test Featured in The Salt Lake Tribune

Share on:   
August 15, 2016
The Salt Lake Tribune ran an article today (8/15/2016) on Sera Prognostics and the PreTRM test. Entitled “Blood test- developed in Utah- provides women reassurance they will bring baby to term,”, the story highlights the statistics on preterm birth, the detrimental long-term effects of preterm birth, and how the PreTRM test can help you and your doctor prepare if you are increased risk of having your baby too early.

The articles posted have been reviewed for content and observance of the principles of the Sera Prognostics, specifically integrity, dialog and respect.

The views expressed by the bloggers/commenters do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of Sera Prognostics.