Category Archives for Pregnancy Calendar

Birthmarks Are Common, Usually Harmless, And Often Fad Away Over Time

About a third of all babies are born with a birthmark of some kind. Birthmarks are mostly harmless, usually disappear within six months, and are not the result of anything done (or not done) during pregnancy. They may appear as pale pink patches on your baby’s eyelids, in the middle of his/her forehead, between his/her eyebrows, […]

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Your Baby Is Ready To Be Born—Your Swaddling Skills Are Now A Must!

Swaddling creates a feeling of containment, just like it was for your baby in your womb. It may help your baby to sleep better and will soothe him/her when crying (Van Sleuwen et al 2007). Practice swaddling your baby when he/she (and you) is in a good mood—and allow yourself several tries before achieving success. Here […]

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Don’t Ever Be Embarrassed At What Your Body Might Do During Labor And Delivery

Having a baby is the one of the most natural (and beautiful!) things your body can do—so whatever your body does in the process of childbirth is nothing to ever feel embarrassed about. Everyone helping you in labor and delivery knows your body just might do any of the following. They will tell you, all […]

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Your Water Breaking Means Your Baby Needs To Be Delivered Within 12 to 24 Hours

At 39 weeks pregnant if no signs of labor have appeared yet for you, that’s ok. First-time moms-to-be average going into labor naturally at 41 weeks; second-time moms at 40 weeks.  It is true that about that 10% of women experience a rupturing of their amniotic sac—or “water breaking”—at this point in pregnancy. (For the other […]

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Put Some Meals In Your Freezer—And Some Takeout Menus In Your Kitchen Drawer!

Having some meals in your freezer during your first weeks as a mom will relieve the stress you will probably be feeling from tiring days and sleep-deprived nights. Main dishes that you can prepare early (and freeze well) include lasagna, soups, stews, and casseroles. You might want to read up on how long a certain […]

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The Unpredictability Of Childbirth Is Here—Savor The Moments!

Get ready for a pelvic exam soon where your cervix will be checked for effacement (thinning) and dilation (opening)—both signs that your body is labor readying. The truth is there’s really no “normal” when it comes to predicting when your labor will begin based on either effacement or dilation. It could be that labor will […]

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Stalled Labor?

When you are in active labor and your labor stops or slows down, this is called “stalled labor.” It’s most likely a temporary situation. The reasons could be that your baby is not descending (even with your contractions).You also could be having contractions without dilation. Despite evidence that healthcare providers should not define “stalled” any […]

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The Truth About Pregnancy Stretch Marks

Did you know it’s normal to see new stretch marks (striae) appearing on your pregnancy belly around week 37—and each week of pregnancy from here on? Actually, more than half of all moms-to-be get stretch marks starting around week 25; they simply become more noticeable about now. Research tells us that the appearance of stretch […]

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Is Your “Going-Into-Labor” Contact Lists Done? Thinking Ways To Announce Your Baby’s Arrival?

If you haven’t already done so, write down the family members and friends you want to contact when your labor begins. (Be sure to include cell, home, and office numbers.) Add to that list the numbers of your local ambulance service, hospital/birthing center where you will deliver, healthcare provider, midwife, and/or doula—if using one. Another […]

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What Triggers Labor—Why Does It Hurt?

No one knows with exact certainty what triggers labor. Researchers have theorized that when babies know they are ready to be born, they simply send a chemical signal to the placenta, which enhances the production of estrogen, which leads to labor. (Maybe the old saying “only a baby knows when it’s ready to be born” […]

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